Bucks
All pictures are courtesy of Old Mountain Farm

Top is StagLee and pictured under him is SisLee, his
dam and then Stag his sire, to the right is Nemesis,
SisLee's dam

Nemisis is dam to the following:

SG +B OLD MOUNTAIN FARM BOLD ELK,  2018
PREMIER HERD SIRE. SIRE TO THE 2018 ADGA
NATIONAL RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION, SGCH OLD
MOUNTAIN FARM SHY ELK AND
THE 2017 NIGERIAN DWARF NATIONAL GRAND
CHAMPION, AND BEST UDDER,  CH OLD MOUNTAIN
FARM MERRIMENT
Old Mountain Farm StagLee
StagLee is the last Stag kid born and it is my hope that he will carry on his sire's legacy


Sire- SG +B Old Mountain Farm Stag VEE
Sire- ++B Dawnland Tabby's Maritimer 'E'
Rosasharn Tom's Water Tabby x Stonewall's India Wilkes
Dam- 2*M AR Deldale Fawn*D'E'AR2157 EEEV91
Honeysuckle Ridge Dakota x SG 1*M AR MCH Denning Hill Michi Kasu 'E'


Dam- Old Mountain Farm SisLee
Sire- Old Mountain Farm Allegiance
Old Mountain Farm Cernunnos 90VEE x Old Mountain Farm Wirosa
Dam- 3*M AR NC Promisedland Nemesis 3*D AR 2383
Rosasharn Farm SS Legolas*S VEV x 2*M NC PromisedLand BW Echo 2'VG' 2*D AR 1936
Information about StagLee's pedigree:

His dam is a half-sister to SG +B OLD MOUNTAIN FARM BOLD ELK, (SG +B Old Mountain
Farm Stag x 3*M AR NC Promisedland Nemesis 3*D AR 2383) who is the 2018 ADGA National
Premier Sire and who is Sire to the 2018 ADGA National Reserve Senior Champion Doe and
Sire to the 2017 ADGA Nigerian Dwarf Nation Champion Senior Doe and Best Udder Doe.

StagLee is also a half brother to Brainstorm who sold in the 2017 Spotlight Sale for $10,400.00  
StagLee is the last kid born that was sired by Stag before he passed away.
WildWind Farm Tides of Honey

Born 2/23/2018

Sire - Algedi Farm CK Kinetic Riptide
(Algedi Farm SS Captain Kid *S  VEE 89 x 5*M GCH Algedi Farm DJ Splash
O' Honey VVEE 90)


Dam - Cuatlilredbarn Pearl 86 VV+V as a first freshener, the
appraiser loved this doe!
(WOOD BRIDGE FARM WINTER STORM x *M GCH AR CU AT LIL’RED BARN
ABBEY EEE91)


Tides of Honey's sire,
Riptide has a stunning pedigree, he is line bred on Algedi
Farm DJ Splash O' Honey, daughter of SGCH Rosasharn's Tupelo Honey and GCH
Algedi Farm Drops Of Jupiter, two of the most well known and incredibly correct
Nigerian Dwarf goats.   Riptide has a strong general appearance, is level over the
topline, tight in the shoulders with correct brisket definition, and has flat ribbing, a
wide rump and awesome rear end assembly.  His littermate sister scored VEVE91
as a 3 year old.
Riptide has some very nice daughters that are doing well in the show ring and 2
finished champion daughters including our own SGCH Joyful Hearts Phoebe
VEEE90.
Pictured below is Tides of
Honey's Dam
Cuatlilredbarn Pearl
Algedi Farm CKKinetic Riptide
*M GCH AR CU AT LIL’RED BARN ABBEY EEE91
picture courtesy Lil Red Barn
click on name to go her page in Cuatlilredbarn's
website
Algedi Farm SS Captain Kid
GCH Algedi Farm DJ Splash O'Honey
MYRTLE TREE FARM MR. STUNNING
DOB: 4/15/2019
Owned by Myrtle tree farm but lives at Wild Wind Farm

Sire - ZANZABEEZ TS MACLINTOCK V
sire - BUTTIN'HEADS TASTIN' SASHIMI
BUTTIN'HEADS MARTINIQUE EEE90 x GCH Buttin'Heads Japanese Washi 3*M
Dam - ZANZABEEZ BLU SHOT OF ESPRESSO
Zanzabeez BB On A Blue Bayou x Fairland Farm SM Java Jive

Dam - MYRTLE TREE FARM SR JEZEBEL
Sire - MYRTLE TREE FARM SIR LANCELOT
(CLOVEN TRAIL LUCKY CHARM QUINN x WILDWIND FARM PAL BONNIE LASS)
Dam is WOOD BRIDGE FARM LUCK BE ALADY
(CH ATWOOD ACRES GR JACKPOT x WOOD BRIDGE FARM CLEODENILE)

We do offer stud service at $200 for StagLee, $100 for any of our other bucks per doe
$20 service charge if your doe takes more than two tries to get bred to help
compensate for my time. This is why it is important that your doe be up on her minerals
when you come to have her serviced



I've decided to not offer outside boarding service due to concerns over biosecurity. For
the time being, we will continue to offer driveway breeding services, which means that
you need to keep track of when your doe is coming into heat so you can bring her at
the appropriate time. If you do not have a buck, it does help to have a "buck rag" (that
would be some sort of cloth that has been rubbed on a buck to collect their
oh-so-dreamy aroma, this rag is best kept in a tightly sealed jar or plastic bag) you can
present to your doe to see how she reacts. Flagging (vigours tail wagging), mucous
discharge, extra vocalizations, swollen and/or extra pink lady parts, ridding other goats,
or allowing oneself to be ridden by other goats, are all signs that your doe is in heat.
Does can be in heat for anywhere from 12 hours (unusual) to two or three days, with
heats much more obvious during the fall, though Nigerians are year-round breeders.
They usually come into heat every 18 to 21 days, though some have shorter cycles; if
you have a doe coming into heat every five to seven days, that is called "short-cycling"
and seems to be caused by either mineral imbalance or ovarian cysts. When this is
happening, it is quite unlikely that the doe will settle.
Does brought for breeding must have proof of a recent (within 30 days) negative CAE
test.  No exceptions. Please try to be on time for your appointment, or call me as soon
as you know you are going to be late so I can try to rearrange my plans accordingly.

Please call ahead to check and make sure that we are going to be around when your
doe is expected to come into heat so we can try to accommodate your schedule. Be
prepared to be the one holding your doe while the buck is servicing her-- does who do
not live near bucks may be a bit "spooked" by the buck when seeing him for the first
time and want to run away. You are responsible for keeping her within range of the
buck, as I will have my hands full as it is with him (not because they are aggressive,
which they aren't, but because they have a low center of gravity and are remarkably
strong when they want to go somewhere).

In order to be fertile, goats need to have a good mineral balance in their systems, with
the two .

We do offer stud service at $200 for StagLee, $100 for any of our other bucks per doe bred. The breeding fee will cover two separate visits for
breedings, and there will be a $20 service charge if your doe takes more than two tries to get bred to help compensate for my time.

I've decided to not offer outside boarding service due to concerns over biosecurity. For the time being, we will continue to offer driveway breeding
services, which means that you need to keep track of when your doe is coming into heat so you can bring her at the appropriate time. If you do not
have a buck, it does help to have a "buck rag" (that would be some sort of cloth that has been rubbed on a buck to collect thier aroma, this rag is
best kept in a tightly sealed jar or plastic bag) you can present to your doe to see how she reacts. Flagging (vigours tail wagging), mucous
discharge, extra vocalizations, swollen and/or extra pink lady parts, ridding other goats, or allowing oneself to be ridden by other goats, are all
signs that your doe is in heat. Does can be in heat for anywhere from 12 hours (unusual) to two or three days, with heats much more obvious
during the fall, though Nigerians are year-round breeders. They usually come into heat every 18 to 21 days, though some have shorter cycles; if
you have a doe coming into heat every five to seven days, that is called "short-cycling" and seems to be caused by either mineral imbalance or
ovarian cysts. When this is happening, it is quite unlikely that the doe will settle.
Does brought for breeding must have proof of a recent (within 30 days) negative CAE test.  
.

In order to be fertile, goats need to have a good mineral balance in their systems, with the two most important minerals for fertility being copper
and selenium. At a minimum, your doe should have a free choice loose goat mineral available to consume at all times. A sheep and goat mineral
will not do as there will be no copper in it (toxic to sheep), but goats MUST have copper. Even with a loose mineral available to our goats 24/7, we
have found the need to supplement with copper bolusing and BO-SE (a selenium/vitamin E shot) at least a couple of times a year. If your doe has
a rough terrier-type texture to her coat, the likelihood of her settling is much lower, as this is a sign of mineral (usually copper) deficiency.  Another
way to judge if your doe is mineral deficient is to look at pictures of her from when she was a kid- is she significantly lighter than as a kid? That is
also a sign of deficiency. If your gold kid is white as a mature adult, or your black doe is turning brown, there is a really good chance that she
needs some extra minerals before you take a drive up to our farm.